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Majorelle Blue in Ubud Bali

Majorelle Blue in Ubud Bali

Jun - 25 2015 | no comments | By

I do not know when and how my love for Majorelle Blue started, but it has been there for a long time.

The French artist Jacques Majorelle created the Majorelle Garden in Marrakech, Morocco in 1924. He used a vibrant blue colour in the garden that made the foliage come alive.

Using it in my garden in Belgium would have been a catastrophe because a third component is needed to make it work: bright sunlight.

When we were building Villa Sabandari and our house in Ubud Bali, I finally got the chance to realise my long cherished dream: paint a wall blue, Majorelle Blue.

At first our architect, Joost Van Grieken, was not very enthusiastic about my suggestion and he proposed to do a test of one square meter on a wall that was, until then a rather neutral, beige colour, and it worked.

We have used Majorelle Blue on a few walls, as accents in the garden, and in some of the open air showers.

Majorelle Blue in Ubud Bali

Garden at Villa Sabandari, Ubud Bali

 

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

Walk starting at one of the Ubud Boutique Hotels

Jun - 25 2015 | no comments | By

The shuttle of Villa Sabandari, one of the newest Ubud boutique hotels, will drop you off at the start of the walk and will pick you up at the end. A phone call to the driver will do the trick.

Campuhan Ridge Walk is a free and easy nature trek, popular among repeat visitors to the central highland town of Ubud. The area provides a great retreat from the more hectic southern parts of the island, but this trail presents an even more pristine outback to escape from the contemporary boutique, guesthouse and restaurant-lined Jalan Raya Ubud. While the hike lets you enjoy cool fresh air and probably the most gorgeous hillside vista in the region, it also allows you to shed off some calories too with its nine-kilometre hill track.

Getting to the starting point is relatively easy. The main access is a concrete path just down from another one of the Ubud boutique hotels, the Warwick Ibah Luxury Villas and Spa’s entrance. Smaller letterings under the signage of the Warwick Ibah, bears “Going to The Hill” with an arrow pointing left, and as soon as you take on this path, the verdant surroundings of the Campuhan Valley immediately come to sight, lined by dense tropical foliage.

Walk from one of the Ubud Boutique Hotels

 

A small bridge over the revered Campuhan River leads to the majestic Pura Gunung Lebah temple complex. Signs before the temple clearly show the directions to follow along the route, which borders the eastern walls of the temple. These intricately carved walls and the towering ‘meru’ tiers of the shrines visible from the path provide an exotic and cultural touch to the beginning of this nature walk. You might meet a few fellow trekkers on their way back from their earlier jog, but most of the time you’ll have the path to your own.

A few hundred meters and up the slopes from the temple, the view widens to reveal the vast hills that make up the valley hinterland. The best time to enjoy the Campuhan Ridge Walk is early morning and late afternoon, when the temperature is cool and when the skies show their best hues during sunrise and sunset. Slopes as far as the eye can see are an undulating sea of green, covered in tall reed grass, which at times are harvested by the locals for thatched roofing that is typical in traditional Balinese architecture.

(c) Bali Magazine

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

Visumplicht Bali versoepeld

Jun - 16 2015 | no comments | By

Reis naar Bali wordt eenvoudiger

Voor hun reis naar Bali hebben toeristen uit dertig verschillende landen, waaronder ook België, voortaan geen visum meer nodig . Ze mogen vanaf nu dertig dagen in het land blijven zonder het document, zo liet de Indonesische regering vrijdag weten.

President Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo zette dinsdag zijn handtekening onder de nieuwe regeling dinsdag. Woensdag werd die officieel van kracht.


De dertig landen zijn Oostenrijk, Bahrein, België, Groot-Brittannië, Canada, China, Tsjechië, Denemarken, Finland, Frankrijk, Duitsland, Hongarije, Italië, Japan, Koeweit, Mexico, Nederland, Nieuw-Zeeland, Noorwegen, Oman, Polen, Qatar, Rusland, Zuid-Afrika, Zuid-Korea, Spanje, Zweden, Zwitserland, de Verenigde Arabische Emiraten en de VS.

Ze vervoegen een lijst van vijftien andere landen die eerder al werden vrijgesteld van een visum. Indonesië wil het aantal toeristen dat het land binnenkomt zonder visum laten stijgen van 9,4 miljoen vorig jaar, naar 11 miljoen dit jaar.

(c) De Standaard

Opgemerkt moet worden dat de visumvrijstelling niet voor alle luchthavens en zeehavens van Indonesië geldt. Meer informatie is te vinden op www.indonesienu.nl . Op deze website staat vermeld dat de visumvrijstelling geldt voor toeristen die via de volgende luchthavens en zeehavens Indonesië binnenkomen:

Luchthavens: Soekarno-Hatta (Jakarta), Ngurah Rai (Bali), Kuala Namu (Medan), Juanda (Surabaya), Hang Nadim (Batam).

Zeehavens: Sri Bintan Pura (Tanjung Pinang), Batam Center (Batam), Sekupang (Batam), Tanjung Uban (Riau).

Geen visum meer nodig voor reis naar Bali

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

The Price is in Rupiah

Jun - 16 2015 | no comments | By

(6/14/2015) The Jakarta Globe reports that effective July 1, 2015, hotel rooms in Indonesia, airline tickets, property leases and most salaries must be paid in rupiahs.

Effective July 1, 2015 Most Transactions in Indonesia Must be in Rupiahs.

The policy being implemented and enforced by Bank Indonesia is intended to halt the slide in the value of the Indonesian Rupiah.

By requiring transaction to be undertaken in Rupiahs the Bank want to decrease the demand for foreign currency and shore up the sagging Indonesian rupiah.Hotel rooms in Indonesia to be paid in Rupiah

Lambok Siahaan, special staff to the Bank Indonesia board of governors, said: “This is about our sovereignty. Excessive forex demand has an effect on our exchange rate and inflation.”

On Tuesday, June 9, 2015 the rupiah hit 13,384 against the greenback – the lowest level since August 1998, in keeping with the its reputation as Asia’s worst-performing currency,

Expat workers hired overseas can continue to be paid in U.S. Dollars.

Key infrastructure projects – such as roads and power plants – can also still have their investment and construction contracts denominated in dollars.

Many companies say they will continue to negotiate and publish prices in dollars and accept payment in local currencies. In fact, all credit card processed in Indonesia are now transacted in rupiahs

The Jakarta Globe said that the new regulations will allows hotels and restaurants to post quotations in dollars for online promotions to attract tourists but settle all purchases in rupiah.

© Bali Discovery Tours.

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

Radio and Television Stations to Go Silent for 24-Hours on Nyepi Day March 21, 2015

Feb - 10 2015 | no comments | By

The chief of the Indonesian Broadcast Commission for Bali (KPID-Bali), Anak Agung Gede Rai Sahadewa, said he will coordinate with TV and radio broadcast stations in anticipation of Bali’s official day of silenceNyepi Tahun Baru Saka 1937 that falls on March 21, 2015.
For a 24-hour period commencing from sunrise on March 21, 2015 – all broadcast station in Bali and national stations providing broadcast feeds to Baliare required to go silent and respect the enforced 24-hours of meditative reflection that marks the start of every Hindu New Year in Bali.

During the Nyepi Period Bali closes down for a 24-hour period. All flights to and from the island cease and streets empty as guests and hotel staff are forcibly sequestered to Bali hotel premises.

Quoted by Metrobali.com, Sahadewa told parliamentarians on Friday, February 2, 2015, “I will coordinate and correspond with television and radio stations in order that all broadcasts in Bali stop for 24 hours on Nyepi Day.”
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“On Nyepi day last year all broadcasts of radio and television stopped for 24-hours in Bali. This year the same rules will apply,” said Sahadewa.

Meanwhile, the chairman of Commission I of the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali), Ketut Tama Tenaya, explained that the cessation of all TV and radio broadcasts in Bali on Nyepi Day is done to respect the Bali-Hindu religious tenets for honoring the day of “Beratha Penyepian” – namely: “amati karya” (no work), “amati geni” (no open fires), “amati lelungan” (no journeys) and “amati lelanguan” (refrain from pleasure).

© Bali Discovery Tours.

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

‘Secret Bali’ captures island’s traditions behind tourist facade

Dec - 17 2014 | no comments | By

Secret Bali:: Behind The Tourist Facade by Jill Gocher with Jean Couteau

Published by Now! Bali Publication 120 pages (Courtesy of UWRF)

Secret-Bali.img_assist_custom-512x560
People who are in Bali, either seasonal tourists or contented expats, may eventually realize that the island has partly turned superficial — with the growing presence of lavish restaurants and shops, luxurious Bali hotels and villas and glittering nightspots gradually transforming the once pristine island.

The traditional life, however, continues as it has for centuries, becoming more secret, hidden behind doors, behind walls, behind the buzz of the ever-growing tourist industry.

As Australian photographer Jill Gocher simply puts it, ”Before, when tourists came here, one thing they would like to do was to see, learn and enjoy the culture, but now it turns into like ‘which party will we go to tonight?’, ‘which restaurant should we dine in?’, or ‘where’s our villa?’”

In her new book Secret Bali, Gocher records Balinese culture with her captivating words and images, to bring it to the attention of people and make them see what the real Bali is about.

Behind all those modern facades, Bali remains a place where “spirits permeate every single corner of the island. They are kept peaceful and placated with daily offerings and prayers that create harmony and special energy for which Bali is renowned”.

In modern buildings, like hotels, “all those statues and temple buildings are not just architectural decoration”. Beautifully made offerings in open doorways are part of the daily spiritual routine to appease the gods in the visible world and the spirits of the invisible underworld (sekala and niskala).

Gocher takes us on a journey in one “mystic evening”, the evening before Galungan — one of the biggest religious celebrations in Bali, as well as visiting the ancient temple complex of Gunung Kawi, the holy spring of Yeh Massam, Ubud’s sacred monkey forest and other places.

Readers will also find it interesting to get a glimpse of the island’s rituals — a-once-in-200-years celebration at Gunung Raung Temple, a Balinese royal wedding, the house-blessing ceremony melaspas, tajen (cockfighting) and ngaben (cremation).

“If one can see only one part of Balinese culture while in Bali, the most spectacular and important of all Balinese rituals is ngaben — the culmination of a person’s life and the sendoff to the next life or afterlife.”

Having moved to Ubud — the island’s artistic and cultural heartland, nine years ago, Gocher has witnessed the changes brought about by the dynamic tourism industry.

Early in the morning, she would head to the traditional market and capture the images of locals’ daily activities, as described in the chapter on Ubud Market.

“Even a visit to Ubud Market reveals much that is Balinese. Try a visit in the early hours before 9 or 10 a.m. when the tourists start to arrive and the ambience changes to a big bazaar,” writes Gocher, who has delighted in photographing the market since she was a student.

Historian and art critic Jean Couteau writes three stories for the book, one of which is titled Food for the Gods, where he complains that Balinese culture, down to its food — not to mention its arts and music — is more and more ‘fabricated’ to suit tourists’ expectations.

Published by NOW! Bali Publications, the work of Gocher and Couteau has been hailed as a “marvelous combination of talents and creativity [that] came together to bring the ‘seen’ and ‘unseen’ elements, the sekala and niskala of Balinese life together in the pages”.

(c) Desy Nurhayati, The Jakarta Post, Ubud, Bali | Feature | Mon, December 15 2014, 10:48 AM

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

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Bali’s Famous and Inspiring Kecak Dance Has a Rich and Varied History

Sep - 02 2014 | no comments | By

We’ve Got Rhythm!

The iconic Kecak dance, performed by large groups of shirtless men chanting in rhythmic counterpoint as other dances presents scenes from the ancient Mahabrata, is a staple of the Balinese dance repertoire that is enjoyed by thousands of Bali visitors each day.

, – oftentimes numbering as much as 150, each segment of the kecak is punctuated by choruses of chanted “cak…cak….cak” (pronounced as ‘chak,chak, chak’) .

Dance aficionados in Bali argue endlessly that the haunting sounds of the kecak represents the sounds of an army of primates in the service of monkey-like warrior Vanara; duplicates the percussive sounds sounds of the drums and gongs of a gamelan orchestra (gamelan suara); imitates the sound of the household gecko lizard or, at its most basic level, draws its inspiration from the “cak” singing of farmers heard in the evening from roadside arak stands across Bali.

When we sat all these alternative descriptions before an aged Bali dance master, the old man scratched his chin and suggested that each explanation of the unique sound of the Kecak, considered individually or severally, might well be true.

The earliest reports of the Kecak predate the Dutch occupation of Bali when, according to local folklore, the village of Bona in Gianyar was besieged by a deadly epidemic that claimed a large number of lives. Prayers for salvation were offered in a local temple when a Sanghyan medium, deep in trance, delivered a message from the resident deities demanding a new form of music and dance unaided by the bronze instruments of a traditional Balinese orchestra.

More contemporary chronicles claim the dance was rejuvenated and reworked in the village of Bedulu by German-born artists Walter Spies and Balinese dancer Wayan Limbak to support a film project in the 1930s or, alternatively, was reborn in Bona under the supervision of I Gusti Lanang Oka and I Nengah Murdarya.

The most recent revitalization of Kecak is credited to I Made Sija of Bona who helped organize and train Kecak cultural groups who eventually traveled the world promoting Balinese culture starting in the mid-1960s.

Not subject to debate is that the fact that Kecak dance presents a scene from the ancient Ramayana tale of the battle between good and evil within the context of the abduction of Sita and the ensuing battle by Vanara against the evil King Rahawana.

Setting aside the hour or so to attend a Kecak dance during a Bali trip should form part of every visitors “must do” list. Village-based dance groups present dances on an almost daily basis across Bali, with one of the most popular presentations found at sunset each evening at the Uluwatu Temple in South Bali.

Those contemplating taking in a kecak might find the follow plot synopsis useful in following the story line.

Scene 1

Rama, Sita and Laksmana enter the dance area where the Kecak chorus of men, sitting in concentric circles have literally “set the stage” by singing a mesmerizing chanted prologue. As the three dancers circulate a golden deer appears, begging capture by Prince Rama. In pursuit of the golden deer, Rama leaves Sita and Laksmana alone on the dance floor.

Suddenly a scream for “help” is heard, prompting SIta to insist to Laksmana that the voice in distress must be that of her husband Rama. Sita implores a reluctant Laksmana to investigate the screams, snidely suggesting Laksmana perhaps seeks advantage in the death of her beloved Rama. Insulted at Sita’s insinuations, Laksmana departs the stage leaving Sita utterly alone in the forest.

Scene 2

The evil King Rahwana appears, intent on kidnapping Sita. His initial attempts are unsuccessful causing him to transform himself into Bhagawan – an elderly man begging water from the Goddess Sita. When Site returns with the old man’s water she is kidnapped by Rahwana still posing as the aged Bhagawan.

Sita’s screams for assistance are heard by the mythical Garuda bird flying nearby who responds by trying aid the captured Goddess. The Garuda’s efforts to assist, however, are thwarted when Rahwana shoots the bird’s wing with an arrow. The dastardly Rahwana then brings Sita to Alengka Pura – his personal palace.

Scene 3

Meanwhile, Rama, his loyal servant and Laksmana have become lost in the forest of the Ayodya Palace. Longing for his beloved wife Sita, who is now in the palace of the evil Rahwana, Rama seeks the assistance of the White Monkey Hanoman to deliver his ring to the captive Sita as sign of their enduring love.

Scene 4

Accompanied by the demoness niece of Rahwana, Trijata, Sita now spends her days lamenting the absence of her husband Rama.

Later, at the Alengka Palace, the White Monkey Hanoman appears, declaring himself the Emissary of Prince Rama and presents Sita with the ring of her husband. Sita, in turn, presents flowers to Hanoman to be given to Rama, together with a message imploring for urgent rescue. Wasting no time, Hanoman wreaks havoc on the Alengka Palace, destroying much of Rahwana’s princely estate. In retaliation, the guards of the palace capture Hanoman who is bound and prepared to be burnt at the stake. Calling on his considerable reserves of magical power, Hanoman escapes and rescues Sita to be returned to Rama.

© Bali Discovery Tours.

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

Villa Sabandari’s Location

Aug - 22 2014 | no comments | By

Bali Hotel Ubud

“Villa Sabandari, Bali Hotel Ubud?”

Not a day goes by without a taxi driver calling me to ask for directions to Villa Sabandari.

In Bahasa Indonesia of course.

In the beginning I used to ask ‘Maaf Pak, bisa bicara pelan pelan ya? Saya tidak bisa bicara Bahasa Indonesia baik baik’, meaning ‘Sorry Sir, can you speak slowly? I do not speak Indonesian well’.

Big mistake.

As soon as the driver hears the ‘Maaf Pak’-part, he switches to overdrive and starts speaking at double the speed.

I am now very well trained to notice the word ‘Alamat’ (Address) though and give him my standard ‘Location Speech’.

It goes like this:

“Dari ujung Jalan Raya Ubud ke timur, ada patung besar Arjuna.
Dari sana, terus ke timur, Jalan Gunung Sari.
Dan di ujung Jalan Gunung Sari ada rumah makan Prabanan dicat oranye dan hijau.
Lurus ke timur kira- kira 100 meter ada restoran Warung Mina, dan di sebelah timur restoran Warung Mina ada balai banjar Ambengan.
Disana belok kiri ikuti terus jalan itu menuju Pura Masceti dan di depan pura ada jalan paping kira-kira 200 meter menuju Villa Sabandari dengan papan nama dari batu putih. ”

If you happen to read this before staying at Villa Sabandari, please do me a favour and show the above to your driver.

It will save me from having to give my “Location Speech’ for the nth time 😉

Terima kasih = Thank you

p.s. You can also show the map below to your driver.

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

New Balinese Dance Spectacle in Ubud

Aug - 05 2014 | no comments | By

TekTok3

 

Spectacular New Balinese Dance Performance Presented Four Nights Per Week at Bali Culture Center in Nyuh Kuning, Ubud

Adding to the growing number of spectacular dance and stage performances available to Bali visitors, the Bali Culture Center (BCC) in Nyuh Kuning Ubud now presents a rare and mesmerizing presentation of the Tektok Dance four nights per week.

Taken from the epic Mahabrata story of India, the Ubud presentation tells of a struggle between King Yudhistira and his brothers and his archrival Duryodhana (Kurava). Lured into a game of chance, Kurava manages to persuade Yudhistira to wager and lose his entire Kingdom.

Claiming the defeated Yudhistira and his brothers as slaves, Kurava seeks the ultimate humiliation of forcing the losing King to undress his Queen and offer her to his nemesis.

A battle of the demi-gods proceeds with Truth and Goodness eventually triumphing over the evil Kurava in the end.

Originating from Lombok, the Tek Tok Dance has been reworked by celebrated choreographers I Made Sidia and I Gusti Gde Jelantik. The music that accompanies the dance is produced solely by syncopations and harmonies from a chorus of human voices.

Working with the seminal influence of a traditional dance form found in Lombok, Sidia and Jelantik have created an entirely new addition to the Bali-Lombok dance repertoire that is now presented every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday evening at 6:30 pm.

Presented on a colossal scale, tickets are only Rp. 190,000 for adults and Rp. 140,000 for children.

For information and reservations telephone +62-(0)361-978144 or +62-(0)82144735658.

© Bali Discovery Tours

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+

Book on Maestro Lempad launched

Jun - 22 2014 | no comments | By

Book launched in Ubud Bali

I Wayan Juniarta, The Jakarta Post, Ubud Bali | Archipelago | Sat, June 21 2014, 11:17 AM

The first-ever comprehensive book on I Gusti Nyoman Lempad, the late Balinese painter, sculptor and architect, was launched Thursday night at the Agung Rai Museum of Arts (ARMA) in Ubud, with poet and journalist Goenawan Mohamad drawing a parallel between Lempad and Spanish legend Pablo Picasso.

“Lempad is one of two painters in the world who were able to present the erotic subject-matter in a profound and meaningful way. The first was Lempad, the second was Picasso,” Goenawan said.

Goenawan recalled that he first met Lempad in 1968, during which the great maestro showed him a series of his paintings on Jaya Prana Layon Sari, a local tragic love folklore story.

The paintings touched Goenawan not only because they spoke about the struggle between the common people against an oppressive king, but also because they underlined Lempad’s mastery in capturing the beauty of human body.

“The paintings mesmerized me of the respect and appreciation of the human form. In his works, erotic subject matter transcended mere eroticism and the human body rose above its physical properties,” he said.

Lempad was born in 1862 and died in 1978 was an undagi, a Balinese term for a respected multi-talented artist, well-known for his black and white paintings, masterful lines and his enduring love for folklore.

He was also an accomplished architect of ritual paraphernalia, including cremation towers and wooden sarcophagi. His sculptures and carvings decorate important temples in Gianyar and Ubud and he also played an important role in the design and construction of Ubud’s Puri Lukisan Museum and Pura Taman Saraswati , a temple famous for its lotus pond.

Lempad, a Timeless Balinese Master is a weighty 312-page hardcover, which is richly illustrated with his work, including those displayed in museums abroad and in private collections.

It was co-authored by Jean Couteau — a French scholar who has lived in Bali for decades and played a pivotal role in deciphering the island’s contemporary arts to the Western audience —, Ana Gaspar and Antonio Casanova.

Gaspar and Casanova are wealthy art collectors that specialize in pre-modern arts. The couple first encountered Lempad’s works seven years ago when they visited the Lempad Pavillion at the Neka Art Museum.

“The works instantly gave me goosebumps,” Casanova recalled.

“I was instantly aware that he must be a very powerful artist, one that was still connected to nature and lived in accordance with the old ways,” he said adding that he had tried to find information and books on Lempad but was unsuccessful.

“It was then that I decided to write a book on Lempad.”

(c) The Jakarta Post

About Dirk Weemaes

Keeping an eye on Villa Sabandari since 2009. Google+